Back In My Kitchen (Mostly)

After my recent perambulating IMK posts, this past month I’ve been rather stationary. Well, except for that week back in Britain, arriving to find red currants in my UK garden at their peak, the Morello cherries a little overripe, as well as a few black currants, loganberries and red gooseberries still clinging to their branches. There was more berry eating, curries consumed, a visit to our favourite Sardinian restaurant and a garden party attended with a Scandinavian themed finger food: multicultural Britain through its food.

Back in the Athens kitchen, a present from a visitor from Turkey:

Open the box…lovely assorted flavours of yummy Loukum, A.K.A. Turkish Delight:

Those peaches from the last IMK post were made into an absolutely fantastic peach chutney. It has a spectacular deep golden colour.

I’ve also been curing fresh anchovies from the market, experimenting with flavourings. They taste nothing like store bought ones – fresh and tasty. We can’t get enough of them. Post coming up soon for the “recipe” – very simple instructions, so I’m not sure it even qualifies as a recipe.

In my kitchen is also a lovely cloudy apple cider vinegar – “biological” as they call organic products here. The cloudiness comes from the “mother” – the enzymes that form the vinegar. It is made from organic apple juice that has been matured in wooden oak casks. The smell is heavenly – just like concentrated sharp apples. Might try it on a batch of cured anchovies…

Watermelon has been on my mind a lot lately. In addition to G&Ts made with watermelon limeade I came up with last year, I’ve been experimenting with other watermelon concoctions.

Watermelons stacked up – a common sight in the summer market.

This time of year, there is a lot of scope to experiment with watermelon – the ubiquitous (and inexpensive) cooling summer fruit!

A monthly IMK (In My Kitchen) post. Check out other IMK bloggers, each of us writing about what’s been happening in our kitchens each month, hosted by Sherry @ Sherry’s Pickings. Earlier IMK posts can be found on former IMK host blogs: Liz @ Bizzy Lizzys Good Things, Maureen @ The Orgasmic Chef) and the fabulous Celia @ Fig Jam and Lime Cordial who began the IMK phenomenon. A chronological listing of my In My Kitchen blog posts can be found on a separate page, just click the link or look under the heading of Diaries in the Menu bar above.

21 comments

  1. Those anchovies look so good. So does the watermelon, I have always had such good watermelon in Greece. All those berries – we have just potted some berry rootstock – white and black mulberries, my favourite – can’t wait till they grow!

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  2. what a gorgeous photo of those delicious berries. the vinegar sounds delightful too. and those watermelons. lovely stuff. thanks for joining in IMK this month. cheers sherry x

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  3. Your anchovies look remarkable! We rarely see the white ones, except in very expensive vacuum packs from Spain. Maybe they are a Mediterranean variety. Lucky you!

    best… mae at maefood.blogspot.com

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    • The anchovies are fantastic. They all start out the same, but from my brief researches, the flesh turns brown with lengthy salting. In other words, it is all in the curing process. Many commercial brands let the fillets soak in salty brine for months as part of the curing process before bottling them in oil – hence the brown colour. Mine were in a salty vinegar brine for only 24 hours. The taste is very different between the two. If you can get fresh anchovies at the fish market, my instructions on how to make them is coming up in my next post.

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    • The fresh anchovies are great. I wonder if the method would work on other small fish? Might be worth a try. Instructions coming up next week on my blog. Thanks for the reminder of scone week. I did participate in the past, so will try to think up something suitable!

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  4. I am also very keen to see your experiments with fresh anchovy curing. one of my favourite antipasti memories from trips to Italy is buying tubs of ‘ Acciughe sott’olio’ – white anchovies, preserved in oil, and heaps of chopped parsley. We can buy cured white anchovies in some of our Italian delis, not prepacked but by weight, quite cheaply. Still, making your own would be so much better. Great photos Debi.

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    • Recipe – or rather instructions – for anchovies coming up next week. They are really easy to do and you can experiment with all sorts of flavourings. I’ve been making them on a weekly basis – buying them fresh in the market every Friday.

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  5. A nice big chunk of cold watermelon would be good right now!!
    Thank you again for the inspiration all those years ago in your former blog life for the sourdough crackers I made today xx

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  6. Debi, what a gorgeous photo of that bowl-full of ripe berries — simply mouthwatering! I’m delighted that you provided a link to your peach chutney recipe, too. Peaches are at their peak here and there’s an orchard less than an hour away. You may even change my mind about anchovies! πŸ™‚ Your fresh ones look and sound so much better than the canned variety. Great post!

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    • Hi Kim, I hope you like the peach chutney. It is lovely – a bit sweeter than mango chutney. It is great with curries, but can also be used with ham, pork and poultry. These “white” anchovies are nothing like the brown ones you get packed in small jars in the supermarket. The brown ones have been salted and cured for months before bottling up and mine are only cured for 24 hours. Am missing those berries now back in Greece!

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      • Debi, I printed off your chutney recipe and it’s in my “must make” file. Personally, I’d eat it straight out of the jar πŸ™‚ but yes, pork & poultry sound yummy with it, too. I was also thinking a Caesar salad would be spectacular with your anchovies — that’s about the only dish I can tolerate them in so far. πŸ™‚

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